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Multiple-languages Language Multiple-languages Culture: «Techniques for learning languages»

From Polyglot Club WIKI

< Language‎ | Multiple-languages
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Here are techniques for learning languages effectively. It is currently under construction.

Bilingual conversation[edit | edit source]

When you are talking with your language & culture exchange partner, make them bilingual for each sentence.

Let's see which language to speak first, and which second:

If you want to focus on understanding,

  1. If your speaking skill is good and your partner's listening skill is bad, you speak your target language first.
  2. If your speaking skill is bad and your partner's listening skill is good, you speak your partner's target language first.

If you want to focus on training,

  1. If your speaking skill is good and your partner's listening skill is bad, you speak your partner's target language first.
  2. If your speaking skill is bad and your partner's listening skill is good, you speak your target language first.

But if it's a chat on computer with text, it doesn't matter which one first, which one second.

If your partner can't speak a sentence well, you should say how to do it, with grammatical assistance, and your partner should repeat it fluently.

Mistake log[edit | edit source]

Keep a log about which type of mistake you tend to make, and pay more attention to it.

Language/Multiple-languages/Grammar/Common-Mistakes This page is also incomplete.

Parse and categorize[edit | edit source]

Find sentences, and parse them with tools such as

http://www.mapsofspeech.com/2017/10/02/treeform/

Then categorize those sentences with the trees' pattern, then you will have a really better understanding of the sentence structures.

Tandem[edit | edit source]

This method is not what you do in the app named Tandem.

In tandem, you and your partner are native speakers of the target language of each other. In a period, you both only speak one's native language. In the next period, you both only speak the other's native language. Then the next period, and so on. The lengths of the periods are equal.

Synonym groups[edit | edit source]

When you find a word, try to find its synonyms, as many a native should know as possible, make them a group, mark their usage differences, and name the group with the word most frequently used or the one you know best.

If you like, you can also have antonyms. But I guess too many words may discourage you.

Morse code training[edit | edit source]

“Are you serious?”

Creativity comes from deviation.

It helps to train concentration for listening. Maybe it's concentration, not limited to listening.

Morse code training software is not hard to find on every common operating system.

Surrounding vocabulary[edit | edit source]

Yes, right now, from words like “computer”, “screen”, “lesson”, “technique”, “polyglot”, “club”, “website”, “browser”, “grim”, “pixel”. What you can see will be on your vocabulary list to memorise.

This method can be combined with “synonym groups”.

Instant sentences[edit | edit source]

Write down whatever sentence you can make up instantly, on the text bar of Google Translate.

Its accuracy is not guaranteed for all languages. You can translate back to check it.

Echo[edit | edit source]

Record your voice when your are reading an article, play the recording to see how you pronounced and if you can understand yourself.

You may have met English teachers who can point out your incorrect pronunciation and have incorrect pronunciation themselves. They lack this type of training.

Keep in mind that your recognising your words doesn't mean that your pronunciation is correct.

Text emerge[edit | edit source]

Listen to a text and look at the translation of the text. Try to recognise every word you heard with the help of the translation.

You may wonder where to find such listening materials with translation. Find a text in your target language, translate it with Google Translate, then listen to the TTS voice.

Active and passive flashcards[edit | edit source]

When creating flashcards, write active vocabulary on the back, the translation is on the front; write passive vocabulary on the front, the translation is on the back.

Active vocabulary is the vocabulary you should have a fluent command of; passive vocabulary is the vocabulary you just need to recall the meanings of which when seeing it.

Affix and root groups[edit | edit source]

Put the words with the same affix or the same root in a group, and memorise them with Anki or something alike.

This helps you to build a solid impression of an affix or a root.

Contributors

GrimPixel and Vincent

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