Corrections

Text from Invir - English

  • The Summer Carnival in Starogorsk XXXI

  • Five years ago, an eighth-grader by the name of Shishkin brought a wheel to an exhibition of children’s technical creativity.
  • This was the exhibition, from which Jeremy escaped.
    • It was a simple, wooden wheel.
    • Its size was like that of a wheel from a child’s bicycle.
    • The wheel rested on the axle, and the ends of the axle lay on supports.
    • The wheel had wide spokes with small grooves and iron balls were moving inside the grooves.
  • The balls seemed to push the rim of the wheel with their weight, and the wheel was spinning ....
  • Yanka laughed and said, “This is a joke!
  • This is what ancient mechanics invented to trick the simpletons.
  • An engine like that cannot run forever!” Jeremy nodded.
  • “No, it cannot.
  • That’s what they said.
  • But the wheel was spinning…” The engine was running.
  • They stopped the wheel, but after a minute, it began to spin again.The wheel spun day and night and was hidden in the school principal’s office, because it disgracefully violated all the laws of physics, mechanics, and many other sciences.
  • Shishkin was reprimanded.
  • Gleb shook his head and said, “Anyway, there was some kind of trick.” “Yes, there was,” Jeremy agreed.
  • “The balls in the wheel rolled just for show.
  • The wheel could spin without them.
  • Shishkin told me one on one later, what the trick was.
    • He had drilled the wheel axle and put a Sparky in it.” “What a Sparky?!” we all asked at the same time.
  • “A living, eternally-lit spark.
  • It has energy-- Type PM.” “You are obsessed with this Type PM.
  • There is no such thing,” Yurka said.
  • “But the wheel was spinning,” Jeremy protested.
  • “Well then, make a spark like that yourself,” Yurka advised.
  • Jeremy frowned immediately.
  • “I cannot.” “But Shishkin did it,” Yurka said.
  • “I think you are just as smart as he is.” “I’m smart,” Jeremy said.
  • “Shishkin is a boy, but I’m a robot.
    • Only a human being can make Sparky, a robot cannot.
    • This is what the recipe says!” “What’s written in the recipe?” Gleb asked.
    • “Well .... this is the recipe for how to light the Sparky.
  • I forgot,” Jeremy creaked in displeasure.
  • “Jeremy, lying is wrong,” Yurka said.
    • “You said that your electronic system does not forget anything.” Jeremy furiously scraped a thick pencil over the paper.
  • “Well, why are you silent?” I could not take it anymore.
    • “Maybe we can make Sparky for your Vaska!” “That’s why I’m silent,” Jeremy said wit a frown.
  • “But you yourself wanted the PM engine,” Gleb recalled.
    • “I did, but then I realized that you shouldn’t make Sparky.
  • You will be harmed by this.
  • A robot cannot harm a human being.” “Harm? From what?
    • From Sparky?” I did not believe it. “No.
  • Making a living spark could cause harm.” “But Shishkin did it,” I reminded him.
    • “That’s his affair,” Jeremy creaked.
    • “He was not given the recipe by a robot.
  • He got it from the Rusty Witches.” Yurka laughed, “From whom?” “I’ll repeat clearly: from the old Rusty Witches.” And here we started plying poor Jeremy with more questions.
    • Jeremy began to tell us about the Rusty Witches in detail and slowly.
    • He probably hoped that we would forget about the recipe.
  • Jeremy told us that the bony disheveled old women wearing clothes with rust stains lived on a large junkyard out of town.
  • They were not robots, but they were not quite human.
  • They were the Witches.
  • At night, when a full moon appeared, they crawled out of their tin huts and danced on empty iron barrels.
    • What else they were doing, Jeremy did not know, although he spent a long time in the junkyard.
    • He only knew that there were old women who were not bad, but among them there were also really mean witches — they kicked Jeremy out of their junkyard.
  • All these witches were very smart.
  • They knew science and witchcraft, especially when it came to metals.
  • “But what does Shishkin have to do with it?” I reminded him.
    • Jeremy slammed the doors in his stomach under his jacket and said that Shishkin met witches when he was looking for some metal parts at the junkyard.
  • He was a polite, educated guy and the witches liked him.
  • Yurka said that Jeremy’s fuse box was completely blown – how cracked have you got to be to make such a story like that up?
  • He had imagined some old women on barrels in the moonlight....
  • “If you don’t believe it, go to the junkyard and see for yourself,” Jeremy snapped back.
  • “The best time for that is at night.
  • Tonight is the full moon.” “Let us all go there together,” Gleb said cunningly. “Right guys?
    • We’ll meet the grandmothers, ask them for the recipe.
  • We are polite and educated too, no worse than your Shishkin.
  • ” Yanka and I yelled, “Hooray, of course, we’d love to.” Yurka grunted.
  • Gleb said thoughtfully, “But guys might get all scratched up among the old rusty stuff.
  • They could get an infection.
  • Keep in mind, Jeremy, all because of you.” Jeremy folded his arms and said stubbornly, “So what!
  • There would be less harm from that than from making the Sparky.”

PLEASE, HELP TO CORRECT EACH SENTENCE! - English