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1) They have been married for five years 2) I have known her for a long time Both sentences are present perfect. But the question is why is there used “Been” in the (1) sentence but not in (2) sentenc

1) They have been married for five years

2) I have known her for a long time

Both sentences are present perfect. But the question is why is there used “Been” in the (1) sentence but not in (2) sentence? Most of the time we use “Been” in the present perfect to say about where the person was. In this case of (1) why we use “been”?  Could you please give me some example?  Thank you

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mahdi1 profile picture mahdi1   
both of them don't refer to one time
the first one refer to a topic that can continue in future
for example:
it has been raining for 2 days
you can't predict what will happen after your word and surly raining will continue
but the second one refer to a sentence that happen in the past and it is done now
for example
I have seen that guy in our club
it means I saw him once and it took place in the past and it is done.
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AreYouAWhay profile picture AreYouAWhay   

“They have been married for 5 years” is present perfect continuous, which tells us that their marriage is still continuing, and that they haven’t separated. “I have known her for a long time” is present perfect simple, which tells us that ‘I’ no longer know ‘her’. Present perfect simple is like the past simple, the action -in this case ‘know’- is finished and completed.

‘Been’ in example 1 isn’t used to say where the person was, it’s merely an addition to present perfect simple which changes it to present perfect continuous, to change the meaning. In other words: Present perfect simple rule: Have+Past participle. Present perfect continuous rule: Have+Been+Past participle.

 I hope this helps smile.gif

    January 201930% GOOD (3 votes)
  • AreYouAWhay profile picture AreYouAWhay   
    I’m not replying to any of your replies again, and don’t reply to any of my comments ever again. You know nothing about grammar, Eugene00087, so bye bye
      January 2019
  • AreYouAWhay profile picture AreYouAWhay   
    Yeah, that’s why your learning language is English.
    Your grammar sucks, by the way
    Who’s talking?
    You’re practically changing the subject to escape your way out of it. Bla bla bla. Half of what you’re saying doesn’t even make sense lmao
    Tell that to yourself, and if you’re so smart, answer the question above
    You mean yourself? ‘Cause you are an ignorant bully, and that’s also a fact.
    You don’t like the fact that you’re wrong and I corrected you, so you insult me?
    If it sucks, then leave.
    I don’t even know why you are still here.
    What did I expect from a Russian smh
      January 2019
  • AreYouAWhay profile picture AreYouAWhay   
    exRanger sorry to have dragged you into this, I corrected Eugene00087 once and now they keep on telling me that I am wrong when I am always right in the things they correct me in, sorry again :/
      January 2019
  • AreYouAWhay profile picture AreYouAWhay   
    Eugene00087
    Yes, ‘cause you’re always right, and everybody else is wrong, especially those who correct you. You’re not even fleunt in English, so don’t answer English related questions, because you’re going to supply people with wrong information.
      January 2019
  • exRanger profile picture exRanger   
    Precisely: While both sentences are, grammatically speaking, "present perfect", the first is in the "continuous" mode, while the second is in the "simple" mode. (note: mode = condition)
      January 2019