Corrections

Text from Invir - English

 
  • Yerkebulan. A steppe story by Galina Emelyanova. Part I.

  • It is as if someone has turned back time.
  • The clouds of steppe dust fly around the hooves of rich landowners’ herds again.
  • The shepherds receive their salaries in kind, in lamb and foals, just as in the old times.
  • In Soviet times, a traveling shop used to come to jailau (a Kazak nomad camp) and it was like a holiday for the whole shepherd family; they bought everything: food, matches, tea, new boots and even children’s toys.
  • Now everyone in the village lives on credit, placing their hopes on a future harvest or offspring.
  • The shepherds Aydos and Batima were a little luckier.
    • Their youngest son got a good job in the city and therefore twice a year he was able to bring them flour, kerosene, tea and sugar.
  • The son married a Russian girl without even asking his mother and father.
  • The war in Afghanistan had taken away the old couple’s first-born boy, Baurzhan.
  • The health of their oldest daughter had been ruined by vodka.
  • They held hope for the youngest daughter, Madina.
  • She obtained a straight-A grade, which gave her a grant for study at the medical institute in the city.
  • She studied there for half a year, but in the same year, in the spring, fragments of a Proton rocket fell on the steppe.
  • In six months, leukemia turned a young seventeen-year-old girl into a skeleton wrapped in skin.
    • She was buried in the local village cemetery marked with a snow white headstone called “mazar” to symbolize her innocence.
  • The summer promised the elderly couple some joy.
  • They migrated at the usual time of the year to jailau, where there were plenty of lambs.
  • A wonderful black foal ran with the other horses.
  • And there was another joy: their son had changed and now respected the old people and customs more, and brought their grandson, Yerkebulan.
  • After four years, they met for the first time.
  • The boy pleased the old people with his round, swarthy face and black eyes.
    • Aidos, with his own hands, put in grandson’s mouth some pilaf (1) without the meat that was usually added for the adults.
  • The old man kissed his grandson’s short hair and tears came to his eyes.
  • The grandson, Yerkebulan, who barely spoke Kazakh, was fussing, wanting modern food and demanding a TV.
  • The grandson was large and chubby.
  • Although he was a sturdy one-and-a-half-year-old child and had undergone the rite of ’tusau kesu’ (2) he still crawled more than he walked.
    • The whole horse herd that was grazing in the steppe Aidos with his wife was owned by a rich man, ”a bai” in Kazakh.
    • And the name of the owner suited him perfectly- “Zhanbai”, “a new bai”.
  • But the old shepherds decided to ask to keep the black-maned foal named “Karanayzagan” (“Black Lightning”) as a payment for their work and make him the“besere” of their grandson.
  • Often the birth of a child coincides with the birth of a domestic animal.
  • In such cases, the foal or young camel is assigned to the newborn and this animal-besere is considered the property of the child.
  • According to a popular belief, the future of a newborn is closely connected with his besere.
  • Therefore, they don’t ride such an animal, they don’t slaughter it for meat or even sell it.
  • On the contrary, they look after the besere just as carefully as they do the child.
  • Having matured with his animal, the child who owns the besere feels confident and learns from an early age to value and groom cattle - the main wealth of the Kazakhs.
  • To be continued...

PLEASE, HELP TO CORRECT EACH SENTENCE! - English